Choosing a Color Scheme

Sometimes choosing a color scheme for a project evolves as you go. Take, for example, my Groovyghan. The Groovyghan is a blanket pattern by Tracy St. John, which was first published in the fall issue of Tangled in 2012. It uses different crochet squares and stitches pulled together by the colors.

You can download the pattern here.

groovyghan pics

by nikpik

I first saw this blanket on Pinterest. There are several variations using different yarns and colors. One (made by Ravelry’s Mayfairy) was sunny and bright, perfect for a little girl’s room. The one above, made by Ravelry’s nikpik, with its muted pinks, green, blues, and splash of red, immediately caught my eye. I found myself drawn to this blanket. Every so often, I’d scroll through my Pinterest “Yarn” board and click on nikpik’s blanket. I could just picture it on my couch.

Being jobless and listless, I decided to attempt it, but my yarn stash was full of what I like to call “good yarn,” small skeins of expensive cashmere I bought on clearance (enough for a lacy scarf, but certainly not a blanket), good quality merino I bought specifically for a sweater I haven’t started yet, and other odds and ends, some cotton, some wool, some blends, no acrylics. Definitely not enough yarn for a blanket.

I wanted to make a blanket that could be used for a long time without worrying about durability. I knew I had to buy yarn specifically for this project. A few months prior, I had made animal hats for my nieces using Vanna’s Choice, a soft acrylic yarn that comes in a variety of colors. You can see the final results here. Besides, I had half a skein of brick, terracotta, brown, red, and other assorted colors. I figured I could use these, too.

Imagine my delight when I found my local craft store was having a clearance sale on Vanna’s Choice! One skein was $1.97! I immediately bought three skeins of each:

brik chocolate colonial blue dusty blue

brick                                         chocolate                    colonial blue                dusty blue

dusty green dusty purple dusty rose purple

dusty green                       dusty purple                dusty rose                             purple

rose silver blue silver grey terracotta

rose                                      silver blue                           silver grey                    terracotta

wild berrywild berry

I went home and started the blanket with Krystal Krochet’s Daisy Squares. This pattern is free, but you have to sign up for her group in order to download it. Also, Krystal requests that you send her one (1) finished square as she uses them to create blankets for charity.

My Daisy Squares use very muted colors

.IMG_0401 IMG_0400

I tried to use some of the leftover terracotta, but I didn’t find the finished squares very exciting. And they didn’t seem to “go together.” I had made all the squares for this pattern before I bought the bright colors. Perhaps if I did these again, I’d be more choosy about which colors to use. After thinking about it a little, I did a border of colonial blue and silver blue. When I joined the squares, I used the dusty green and did a border around all of the squares. Looking at the panel now, I’m satisfied with the color harmony.

For the next panel, I decided to try the block stitch, and used all the odds and ends from leftover projects. I had worked about 20 rows, but I really wasn’t satisfied with the look. I frogged the entire thing without taking pictures (sorry). I didn’t dislike the stitch, but I had crochet off the daisy squares without blocking the panel first, so the entire thing was a little wonky. I decided to postpone that panel and went on.

I wondered how working with only three colors at a time would look, so when I started the Large Circle panel, I used the dusty green, dusty blue, and silver grey, varying the number of rows in each color.  I joined the squares using the dusty green, then spent an entire night adding a border of wild berry, rose, and pink, only to end up frogging the borders. Again, no pictures were taken ( I really have to remember to take pictures!!) but it did give me the idea to finish the blanket in those three colors.

IMG_0404

I must point out that I am not following Tracy St. John’s pattern exactly. I’ve taken inspiration from her blanket and nikpik’s blanet, but I’ve also used Lucy at Attic 24’s mini ripple pattern found here. Notice I used the purple and grey scheme here.

IMG_0405

Next, I tried Bernat’s Wonky Square. Notice that you can download the pattern for free, but you have to join the website. I decided quite by accident to use the brightest, deepest colors I had. The effect was absolutely beautiful! I was so excited that I used the same colors, substituting the wild berry for the brick on the next square.

IMG_0396

The Picture Frame square by Lisa Naskrent is part of Interweave Crochet’s Fall 2010 Chain Reaction Afghan Project. I especially love, love this square!

IMG_0397

As you can see, I started with very muted colors, but as I’ve worked on different sections of the blanket, my color selection has changed. I’ve learned not to be afraid that colors don’t match. I still have a ways to go on this project, so check back to see my progress.

I can’t wait to see what it will look when it’s done.

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11 thoughts on “Choosing a Color Scheme

  1. Pingback: It’s HERE!! | Mighty Knitting Chick

  2. The link provided to download the pattern….doesn’t work! I wish it did, I will try to find it from facebook….nice blog!

      • I do! It is under Sanderella’s. I should add my Ravelry button to this blog. Thanks for the reminder.

      • I haven’t either. When I was crocheting lots of hat, dish/wash cloths….I signed up with Ravelry. I am a member of two or three groups, and I really need to get back in there and clean up my account, and start being active and participate again! I spend way….too much time on FB and my blogs! Lol….

      • I know! I do the same thing, but I do like that the yarn community is so helpful when I have questions, and there are some awesome groups!

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